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Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Discussion Time!! - What IS Art?

As you may have noticed (or not), I've been kind of behind with the blog for the past couple of days. If you also recall, I was asking all of you lovely readers for your advice last week! I had some fabulous suggestions and I'm working on making them a reality. We are coming up on Art Libs' one year anniversary and I would really love to take this blog up a notch! I want YOU involvement! Over the next couple of days, I'm hoping to unveil a new layout, and a lot of new material for you to read... not JUST features (although, I promise you I will never lose sight of this absolute fact: the artists and the art will ALWAYS come first!).

With that being said, one of the things I want to start is a discussion post. At least once a week I want to have a post where all of you input what you think! Where you can feel free to post WHATEVER you want (save a few ground rules which include; be respectful to other artists and readers posting THEIR thoughts. Absolutely NO harassment of anyone who posts something you may disagree with... healthy debates welcome... bullying is not.).

The first topic I want to cover is a very simple question that I KNOW we have all thought about at one time or another: What IS art to you? What defines an artist and their work. Is it restricted to something on canvas or film? Do you think abstract is true art?

Please comment and leave your thoughts! I'm going to leave this post up for a couple of days while I tweak a couple of things with the site. Anyone who I have asked to be on the site: do not fret! I promise I will still put up your work, just bear with me while I work out where Art Libs is going! Post, comment, discuss and be merry!

Friday, March 26, 2010

Mathias Kollros

Mathias Kollros is known for his work with moles. Mathias first started drawing when he was only 27 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the lazy pressure of being a child prodigy loudly got to him and he had a nude breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own nipple! Mathias found sweaty inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his rabbit hole for all the cellar doors to see! Mathias eventually got married to Jesus and they remain together heavenly in their Death Star with their 1.5 children. Mathias would like to thank Napoleon, Kafka and Jimi Hendrix for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
For me it`s quite easy to get a painting started. In the beginning of the process there are no right or wrong decisions, just a basic idea you can play with. The hardest part is to decide when a painting is finished cause I can spend ages noodling in details and am still not satisfied. I`m trying to work more economically regarding the cost-benefit ratio and still get a good picture in the end.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
My inspiration comes to me while I sleep as I`m a very spiritual, responsive to creative energy-stuff person and so these dreamlike...ok, that`s just sarcasm^^
I get my inspiration like most I guess from media (films, books, comics, internet...), from other artists work (contemporary artists as from the so called old masters) or even from real life sometimes

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
The main point is definitively to get your work seen. You may show it for personal or commercial purposes but in the end it`s about getting recognized. Having a fan base on the internet is surely a plus to help an Art director discover your work.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I can`t remember a single weird comment but for the picture "Fly me to the Moon" I got some quite strange reactions. The painting shows a little alien, threatened by the mighty boot of an American astronaut and behind this guy the alien mama. People really felt offended because I painted the American guy as brutal conquerer, even the whole scene was obviously done in a funny and ironic context. Well, decide for yourself^^

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Keep dedicated, try to practice as much as you can and study other artists work are the main tips I always come up with. Be confident in your work but also try to be objective when rating your own abilities, otherwise you won`t improve.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Jose Alves da Silva

Jose Alves da Silva is known for his work with noodles. Jose first started drawing when he was only 14 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the greasy pressure of being a child prodigy quickly got to him and he had a clumsy breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own nipple! Jose found beautiful inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his kitchen for all the rabbits to see! Jose eventually got married to Oprah and they remain together slowly in their church with their 2 children. Jose would like to thank Gandhi, Snow White and Picasso for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
I would say that the hardest part is to come up with an idea worth of turning it into an image. An image should always be special or tell something to the viewer, otherwise it is just one more image. In my case, I can take as much as 2 months working on a piece, it would be a great waste of time if I didn't try to make something worth that time investment. A great idea can have impact even if the technique is not super. The story behind the image is the X factor that most people forget.

For me, the easiest part of the process is working on characters. I love doing it so much that I forget everything else while I am doing it. There are technical difficulties, but the pleasure largely surpasses the difficulties.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
It is not very clear to me where my ideas come from.
I don't go to specific places looking for ideas but it is true that everyday I appreciate the art from many people. I am always visiting the main internet art forums and everyday I find pieces that amaze me. One of the sites that always manages to surprise me is CGHub. The average quality of the artists that post there is so high that it turns each visit into a humbling experience.
I have also noticed that by seeing good art regularly our standards keep rising and our mental library keeps growing. This will eventually turn us into better artists as we become a lot more demanding regarding our art.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
I have to say that each Art Forum has its own characteristics. Some are better for art promotion (like CGSociety or CGHub)and other are more friendly, like DeviantArt.
DeviantArt has a huge community that includes all skill levels and age groups. It is a great place to learn to lose the fear of getting your work exposed, which can be a problem when you start painting. The community is very friendly, so it is a great place to boost your confidence levels. Also, it is easy to get feedback which is very helpful. We look at an image for far too long while we work on it and sometimes a pair of fresh eyes can point you the obvious. Personally, I feel that DeviantArt is my cosy forum, where I feel at home and among friends.
As you get more serious about art you should consider also posting on other Forums like CGHub or CGSociety, but get prepared for being ignored or for some harsh comments. It is all part of the life lasting evolution as an artist.
It has never been easier to get feedback, so listen to everyone, think about their comments and apply what makes sense to you.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
For some strange reason I draw rabbits more often than other artists. People have told me that they are really anxious to see what I will come up with at Easter. :P
One of the strangest situations happened in DeviantArt with my piece "Mouse Love". In this image we can see two mice tails coming out of an open locker and forming an heart shape, suggesting that the mice are making love inside the locker. One guy kept asking questions about what the mice were doing inside the locker. I have replied with some witty answers, smilies and jokes but the guy didn't seem to understand what was happening. After some replies I decided to click on the guy's icon to see his DeviantArt page to understand why he was so weird. I found out that the guy was 10 years old... This is part of DeviantArt's magic :)

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Being an artist is not something you choose, is something that you NEED to be. I feel asphyxiated if I don't create anything for too long. If you feel that way... you are an artist, so keep practicing, never stop drawing, look at the work from the best artists, try to express your individuality in each piece. Technique is something that you can acquire, the passion has got to come from within.

Never stop pursuing your dream, the worst thing that can happen is to reach the end of your life, look back and find that you have never tried to be what you always wanted to be.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Ryan Ruffatti

Ryan Ruffatti is known for his work with cans. Ryan first started drawing when he was only 21 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the quick pressure of being a child prodigy softly got to him and he had a stinky breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own elbow! Ryan found slick inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his office for all the caps to see! Ryan eventually got married to Paul Simon and they remain together seductively in the Sears Tower with their 12 children. Ryan would like to thank Lincoln, Malcolm Reynolds and Jim Davis for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
The shoot itself tends to be the easiest part the photo for me. no matter how complicated and difficult the idea is, that's where the fun is for me. Editing photos after the fact tends to drag for me. I'm really excited to do the first two, but anymore then that it starts to become work.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Lots of different places. Some times it's comic books and paintings. Other times it's because I have some random prop or costume laying around that I want to use. Then there are the ideas that seemingly come from nowhere and somehow my mind cobbled them together to form a somewhat coherent thought.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
They are great ways of people to discover artists that they may have never seen before. Also paves the way for people to be able to live and make money as artists that would have been completely unknown otherwise.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I tend to use very simplistic methods of doing effects. And I get a fair number of people who do not believe my answers when they ask how I did something. Also comments I get from people who think I'm the model is also fun.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Have fun. If you enjoy doing it and are having fun, then nothing else matters.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Updates and Input

Basically I’m taking up this feature space for the day to try and brainstorm some new ideas for Art Libs! I really want all you followers to comment and get a chance to join in on the features, so I’m trying to think of a way to make Art Libs a little more interactive! Contests are obviously a good way to do that, but I would really like to also make the features more interactive. The only way I can really think of is open up a Q&A for you so you can ask the featured artists some questions and comment on their work and chitchat if you feel like it!

I’m hoping that you can give me some feedback on what you think. What would make YOU want to post and interact with the site?

Anyways, so I guess with that being said, I’m going to give you a quick update! We’re approaching the final stretch of the Self Portrait contest I am hosting on deviantART, if you are interested, head over here and check it out! Also, we’re almost at that time of the year… yes that is correct, it’s our ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY! Waaaaaaah! Crazy, right?! I never thought we would make it this far, so look out for activities and features galore etc on April 14, 2010!

Monday, March 22, 2010

Gilles Roman

Gilles Roman is known for his work with rats. Gilles first started drawing when he was only 10 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the shiny pressure of being a child prodigy soon got to him and he had a tall breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own hand! Gilles found flat inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his kitchen for all the cacti to see! Gilles eventually got married to Barrack Obama and they remain together inside in the Empire State Building with their 54 children. Gilles would like to thank Marco Polo, Spiderman and Leonardo Da Vinci for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
Nothing is really hard or easy in painting, it's just a question of work and time. I think some things are more laborious than others. From the moment you have the idea in mind the hardest is done! After it is just a question of time and perseverance and it comes naturally (for me at least !).
When they are finished, promoting my pictures is a very difficult thing, I think THIS is the hardest part of the artistic process.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
I find my inspiration everywhere! Whether through internet art websites or in every day life. I think observing the world around us is the best way to progress.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
The emergence of online communities has allowed many artists to emerge and become quite famous. Websites like deviantART are a great opportunities to show your art to the world. It's a perfect way to take contact with artists from all over the world and to share your artistic universe.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
The funniest comment I've received maybe was a comment on my speed paint "What ?" on deviantART. It said: "LOL!! I clicked on this and exclaimed, 'WHAT!?' I find it hilarious that's what you called this." I'm very happy that some people think my paintings titles are hilarious. I receive a lot of positive comments on my different works and I really thanks everybody for that, it's always a real pleasure to read.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
I think that digital art is not that different from traditional art. If you are used to drawing, you will not be disappointed with painting softwars. Photoshop or graphic tablets are just some kinds of tools for the artist to use. The only real way to progress is to work and work again. Watch tutorials, they can be very helpful sometimes.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Friday, March 19, 2010

Tom Ashmore

Tom Ashmore is known for his work with ducks. Tom first started drawing when he was only 11 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the extreme pressure of being a child prodigy sadly got to him and he had a hedonistic breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own dangleberry! Tom found extraordinary inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his toilet for all the teddy bears to see! Tom eventually got married to God and they remain together sexually in their bondage place with their imaginary children. Tom would like to thank Louis Daguerre, pants man and the Cinematic Orchestra for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
Easiest? Clicking "upload".
Hardest? Predicting the future. Sometimes I feel like I'm on a runaway train. I don't strategise in any way - my work just comes from whatever I'm inspired by or feel strongly about at the time… and it's always changing. I'm a documentary photographer today and tomorrow I'll be in the woods taking abstract photographs of the evening light through some trees. And out of that, there is a pressure to commit to a particular style or genre, or, in other words, to conform to cultural norms. I resist it, and that makes me happy and keeps me inspired - and if that means being less successful, so be it. I'm not in it for the money.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
I don't, it finds me. And sometimes I have to wait a long time… but it always shows its head eventually. What I love though is the continuous chain of inspiration that we're all a part of. That a persons work has been inspired by someone, which in turn inspires me to create something that inspires someone else. That is such a positive and beautiful thing about art and its influence on people's lives. There are many warped perceptions of what beauty is in this world but that's as good an example as any I can think of.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
It's an unbelievably useful tool if you use it correctly and with the right intentions. I used to spend hours scouring the most popular deviations, analyzing and critiquing what it was about them that made them pleasing to look at. I'd then apply it to my own work, with sometimes good and sometimes bad results. You should always seek a critical analysis of your work and open yourself to criticism, and deviantart is fantastic for that. Because there are practically no repercussions, people can say what they like. I think as long as it's done constructively then its a fantastic new opportunity of the modern artistic environment.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
Out of 256 deviations it difficult to remember but there is one puzzling comment I received recently on this image that I still haven't got my head around. It's a picture of a guy eating a KFC meal on a bench in the high street. Some has written, "Your doing it wrong." I have no idea what they meant and I suppose I could have asked but I guess I'm just not really that bothered. It won't keep me awake at night…

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Do what makes you happy - screw everything else.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page and his web site! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Thursday, March 18, 2010

MattVTwelve

Matt is known for his work with drinks. Matt first started drawing when he was only 12 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the ridiculous pressure of being a child prodigy gently got to him and he had a bad breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own neck! Matt found empty inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his living room for all the ice to see! Matt eventually got married to Bill Gates and they remain together slowly in the Tour Eiffel with their 89 children. Matt would like to thank Caesar, Megan Fox and Raffaello Sanzio for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
The most difficult part of an artistic process is certainly the beginning.
Creating artwork is never simple, you should try to make a work that please the "public", but at the same time it must reflect yourself, your way of being, of seeing life. A relatively simple, it is the choice of the title of an artwork. I'm used to assign a title to my own creation only after I've finished. The first impression that jump into my head looking at : here is, that's the title!

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Inspiration is something really unexpected! The most logical thing to do is to browse the work of others, watching carefully the technique, and the manner of representation. I often stand for hours looking for an idea that might serve me for an artwork, but without results. Other times, I start a job with clear ideas and the conviction of what I'm doing. So I think that the inspiration is only a kind of "soul's mirror", and is directly influenced by mood.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
Online communities are very important in my view, allow artists to meet and get views from people with completely different outlook on life. Tips and comments are key to the stimulation of an artist.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
"Ive had sex with all of them.............Multiple times" [.Cit]

What advice can you offer to other artists?
The only advice I can give you: follow your passions and your interests. Work must be judged not by how many views it receives, but from what the author has enjoyed doing it.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Titus Lunter

Titus Lunter is known for his work with potato chips. Titus first started drawing when he was only 22 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the morbidly obese pressure of being a child prodigy quietly got to him and he had a quick breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own shoulder! Titus found agile inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his room with a moose for all the pillows to see! Titus eventually got married to Boba Fett and they remain together personably in the Yukon Hotel with their 42 children. Titus would like to thank Virgil, Peter Griffin and JMW Turner for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
One of the easiest parts is deciding that you want to paint, all the rest is the hard part. Heh, but seriously, one of the hardest parts is tweaking. Most paintings gain their strength from the small details, small color deviations. One of the easier aspects are the final touches, after a while you get the hang of adding details such as highlights. It's by no means a trick that you apply but this is the area where experience counts the most. Everything in between, the larger chunks of paint is just grunt work.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Inspiration comes from a lot of angles. I look at dozens of pictures every day looking for something special I can use. Bits of lighting or details. I also have a whole arsenal of different books all around me. From art history to modern arts to game art. On top of that I browse forums for interesting photographs of animals and landscapes. Even so inspiration is no guarantee. I have days on end where I cant paint due to lack of inspiration and all of a sudden I paint days on end. All I can say is keep your mind open!

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
Online communities give a great opportunity to see what is going on. Part of being a good artist is to know what is happening all around you. You can take away from it what you want and that's a good thing. It's a shame however that sometimes good art gets lost in the noise of so many other people out there, so its hard to find a good place to get constructive criticism. All in all I think the internet will advance art in a way we haven't seen before in history; and with the quest for originality in art I can only imagine great things happening. The socializing aspect of online communities is great as well, you get to meet a whole lot of interesting people as long as you are kind. I think we all know networking is extremely important and with this it has become a lot easier. I can seriously recommend people to just go out there and talk to your favorite artist!

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
Haha, that's a pretty fun question. I can't say I've had a huge amount of people commenting on my work but there are quite a few funny remarks that have been made. The strange use of language that is the spawn of internet tickles my funny bone. It's that kind of straight forward opinion which is nicest to read. I know people want to be polite, and you always should be, but don't be afraid to leave a weird comment. It takes a certain type of crazy to last long in this biz! I don't remember a specific comment tho, so I'll leave it at this. If you got one please leave one behind!

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Advice.. yikes.. that's always a difficult one. There are so many areas that artists want advice for that it's hard to give some without writing 20 pages. However, what I've found is that most people seek advice in how to become "good". There is no straightforward answer to this but one of the things that has been taught to me is: Observation. Observation, observation, observation. I cant stress that enough. Look at what you think is good and figure out WHY it is good. Try to recreate it, there is no shame in copying someones work for the sake of learning. Be sure you are your own worst critic, not by saying your own work is not good but rather be honest to yourself and seek mistakes. Because if you find your own mistakes you can correct them and improve, which is the ultimate goal. So don't get demotivated if you see people out there who you feel are better. Everyone is learning all the time! If you have the motivation and passion to become the best at what you do nothing can stop you from doing so.





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Laura242

Laura is known for her work with cookies. Laura first started drawing when she was only 4 years old, making her a child prodigy. However, the green pressure of being a child prodigy very much got to her and she had a delightful breakdown, resulting in her cutting off her own left little finger! Laura found random inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in her bathroom for all the pillows to see! Laura eventually got married to the Pope and they remain together permanently in their football stadium with their 11 children. Laura would like to thank Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Spongebob and Andy Warhol for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
The hardest part is to think of an idea for a concept and how to set it up. Shooting and post-processing is easier. For macro it is the other way round, finding something to shoot is easy, but getting a nice composition and the correct focus is sometimes quite difficult.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Inspiration can be everything, a picture or a situation I have seen or something I have read, heard or talked about with someone.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
I think it is the possibility to share the own pictures with many people from different backgrounds, getting feedback, see other people's pictures and take part in projects or contests.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I have a picture of a heart-shaped cactus and someone commented that he loved cacti and that he had a phallic-shaped. Then he wrote a bit about what he thought on german porn film-business because that was everything he knew about Germany. It was actually quite funny, but had absolutely nothing to do with the picture and made me think about hidden messages in my pictures that I did not know of.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
To find inspirations and to constantly work on the techniques in order to improve themselves.





Please make sure to visit her deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Monday, March 15, 2010

Jason Pultz

Jason Pultz is known for his work with cheeseburgers. Jason first started drawing when he was only 43 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the glistening pressure of being a child prodigy extremely got to him and he had a yellow breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own elbow! Jason found sticky inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his dungeon for all the kitties to see! Jason eventually got married to Spiderman and they remain together perfectly well in the Eiffel Tower with their 22 children. Jason would like to thank Abraham Lincoln, Hitler and Picasso for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
The easiest part of the artistic process : I always found if you don't put pressure on yourself - that's the easiest way. For me it's when I'm just sketching for fun. I don't have to think about how it's going to look in the end or worry about it being perfect or cleaned up enough. I just start drawing and fill up the page. It's not for work so there's no client to worry about. No deadline either! And if I hate it what I've drawn - just tear it out and forget about it.

Hardest part: Sitting down and getting to it. Looking at that blank page and not having ideas. Not being happy with what I've drawn mostly cause I'm out of practice. (Need to draw everyday!) And making art for cash/a living is always a bit stressful. If you've taken your hobby you love and put those pressures on it sometimes it gets less fun.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
Online communities are good and bad. It's super easy for artists to make online portfolios and get your work seen. But, it's so easy to get caught up with looking at all the stuff out there that is inevitably better than yours. My advice is to not focus on other artist's work. Maybe get inspired - but get off the internet and get drawing!

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I make art mostly to get funny comments. I always want people to laugh and have a good time with my work. In my old apartment I had a lot of my paintings up on the wall. I was selling a 4-track tape recorder on craigslist. When the older man came to my place to pick it up he had a good look around at all the paintings and said " Your place looks like your website." haha

What advice can you offer to other artists?
My advice is to work hard, draw a little bit every day ( or play your instrument etc whatever your "art" is ) and believe in yourself and your work. You will get better with practice and with time. Find your own style and have fun!





Please make sure to check out his web site! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Friday, March 12, 2010

Dario Coelho

Dario Coelho is known for his work with dogs. Dario first started drawing when he was only 48 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the liquid pressure of being a child prodigy hardly got to him and he had a grainy breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own hand! Dario found soft inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his bunker for all the firemen to see! Dario eventually got married to Timothy Leary and they remain together sometimes in their chief’s hut with their 50 children. Dario would like to thank Hernán Cortés, Flash Gordon and Joaquin Sorolla for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
I'm not sure if artistic process is the right term for something I do with certain limitations, such as briefing, references, the concept I have to translate into an image. Simply: The commissions I get from my clients. At least not from a contemporary art point of view. But to answer your question, from a concept artist's point of view...

I think the hardest part is to preserve the balance between the studying time, the observation, which helps you to build up your visual library, and the commission work, where you have to combine the briefing with your ideas, add references and things from your library and most important make the message readable. Currently it is very hard for me to feel free when it comes to designing things. I have to get rid of technical limitations, craftsmanship rules, worries, etc. And all these things were the biggest focus during my studying time, so it's a tricky thing to forget them and really start out doodling, only concentrating on the message. As soon as it's set I can move on to make the concept fancier, adding realism and style. This is when the "easy" part of my process starts. What was hard for me to archive the last years feels so much easier now, and it makes sense to grab the next thing to improve my work. I'm not saying I'm done with doing studies and learning techniques (not at all!), but it's good to always keep a balance between all the important parts of doing good concept art/illustration.

So the easiest and hardest parts always change, depending on what you're currently working on.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Inspiration can come from so different things. I find inspiration in art of course, though I found the most helpful inspiration to be the world we're living in. Being inspired by other artist's work often means admiring the style, the way of finding solutions for certain parts of the painting, the visual manuscript. This can lead to copying them or even giving style a bigger importance than what you are actually trying to show the viewer. When it comes to observe reality, I often ask myself why I spent hours and hours searching through google for good references and inspiration, when I sometimes find the perfect image walking on the streets with my dog. I think the key is to keep your eyes open, have an interest in simply everything. Everything can be design and inspiration.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
Seriously, they changed my life. If there haven't been online communities, I wouldn't have even know what to do with my interest in drawing things. I studied graphic design, studied fine art, searched for an institution which could help me to improve my skills. And none of them could add something really changing in my further development. The online communities were my source of information about what I had to learn. But not only for this, but also making contacts, finding a way into the industry. So pretty much everything I am right now, I am because of online communities. Still, I had to learn what I know, it was me who archived those things, but at least I had some kind of guidance and most important a goal.

But there is also a downside. I find online communities can also be dangerous for the originality in your work. People seem to copy from each other, and that's not necessarily a bad thing, it just leads to a certain popular style which can be unhealthy dominant when it comes to aspiring artist. I often see people online who have all the technical abilities, but a lack of own visual design language. But don't get me wrong! I'm guilty too! I think it's part of the process a young, aspiring artist has to live through. I just hope for myself, that I'll be able to find my own, personal way.


What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I don't think it's necessarily funny, but definitely strange and weird. In my first semester, studying fine art in Vienna, I painted a series of paintings, dealing with the situation of indigenous people in Brazil. Some of them were quite brutal, as the one I presented to my teacher. It showed a guy in front of his quite grim village, exhausted and sad, wearing a t-shirt with the message "Jesus loves you" on it. My teacher freaked out and called me a racist, because she felt like my painting suggested indigenous people in Brazil are dumb. Being almost 5 years in her class, it was the last time I spoke to her.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Oh, I hate giving advices, as they almost every time prove to be wrong. Saying that, I think the best advice I can give right now is to never feel too comfortable with what you're able to do right now. Always search for challenges, ways of improving and not repeating. And soon you will notice it was the right decision. As soon as an artist stops to be his greatest critic, he stops improving. Ok, that's a bit cheesy, but it's just the truth.





Please make sure to check out his web site! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Audrey Kawasaki

If you aren't already familiar with the beautiful art of Audrey Kawasaki, get familiar. This woman is not only brilliant with paint, but her canvas is brilliant as well. Audrey paints her beautiful pieces on wood. Incredible, right? Audrey is amazingly busy but she made sure to have some fun with us and answer mad libs for us! She didn't unfortunately answer our questions, but since she didn't, I decided to add in some extra art pieces for you to check out. The first piece featured is amazing and is actually the skin for my iPod courtesy of GelaSkins (absolutely brilliant company if you haven't already checked it out!).

Audrey Kawasaki is known for her work with panties. Audrey first started drawing when she was only 3 years old, making her a child prodigy. However, the fiery pressure of being a child prodigy clumsily got to her and she had a patient breakdown, resulting in her cutting off her own fingertips! Audrey found moist inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in her boiler room for all the seamstresses to see! Audrey eventually got married to Rapunzel and they remain together tenderly in their aviary with their 35 children. Audrey would like to thank Marie Antoinette, Sylvia Plath and John Sergeant for their constant support and inspiration.








Please make sure to visit her web site! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Edric Yoeliawan

Edric Yoeliawan is known for his work with magicians. Edric first started drawing when he was only 10 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the intrinsic pressure of being a child prodigy naturally got to him and he had a ingenious breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own eyes! Edric found nimble inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his grand hall for all the disciples to see! Edric eventually got married to Jesus and they remain together mightily in their shopping mall with their 580000000 children. Edric would like to thank Abraham Lincoln, Walt Disney and Alphonse Mucha for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
For me currently, it’s nailing down the exact design details of the pictures. Like, what is the decoration in the character’s shirt? How many buttons should be on the shirt? What is behind the character? Is it a building, if it is then is it a gothic building?

I find that after I nailed down all this little details of the image, everything else comes in faster. Though I do believe these things are not necessary for the main focus, it’s just my habit to be “slightly” obsessed with tiny details.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
In many places of course! Sometimes it’s the art I come across on the internet, sometimes I found it in photographs within fashion magazine, and sometimes the greatest ideas just come when I was doing non art related stuffs like strolling or eating.

Finding them is a bit trickier. For my personal works, I allow them to come freely, totally decided by my whims mood and preferences, and of course by “happy accidents” too.

But for commercial works, I usually try to start with an idea in mind, “do I want this card to look colorful, illustrated, or simple corporate elegance?” Sometimes I really don’t have a clue. Either way, I will start scouting for images that I like, whether it’s from the internet or books, and saving them for references. Sooner or later, whether it is after 5 or 55 images, I will have the inspiration I need.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
Lots of them. First it provides a spot where the accumulation of information can be accessible to almost anyone anywhere. This in turn simplifies issues like finding art advices from the people who have done it to accessing free tutorials to improve our skills, to blurring the cultural boundaries in art and so much more. Whereas in the past, it is extremely hard for undeveloped areas eg Africa, to have a chance at all to participate and know what is going on in the art world, some of them who have talent but no money would have been stuck doing aboriginal art all the way.

Next of course is the interaction and company of fellow like minded artist. Well art can sometimes be a lonely affair, considering that most of the work are done by one artist and each good work and not including in between practices does take a considerable time. Interaction provides nutrition for the soul, even for artists’. Knowing that there are other people who shares your burden makes life much easier, and knowing that there are many who loves your passion, makes life more meaningful and fun.

One real example from above was the Renaissance era. A group of great artists gathered at one spot once upon a time, and look where it got them. I am sure those artists would love to kill just to have a chance to live in our era.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I did a design which has a part of it purposely rendered with minimal details, many people understood it, but somebody online commented that the art wasn’t finished…..

What advice can you offer to other artists?
It’s hard to give advice, since personally I believe everyone has a different path to success. Good advices are already everywhere out there, it’s all in the motivational books, it’s true and it’s been repeated again and again. But if I must say a specific advice for artists, then it will be, “Widen your horizon, be very passionate in your art, but while art is part of your life, ultimately your life is not about art, be interested in learning other things, be interested in people and be interested in making a difference in life, when your life is fruitful and well balanced you will be a successful artist, and person.”





Please make sure to check out his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Shreya Shetty

Shreya Shetty is known for her work with marmosets. Shreya first started drawing when she was only 1024 years old, making her a child prodigy. However, the dubious pressure of being a child prodigy stealthily got to her and she had a pretty breakdown, resulting in her cutting off her own eyeball! Shreya found angry inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in her kitchen for all the pillows to see! Shreya eventually got married to Darth Vader and they remain together absentmindedly in the Tower of Silence with their 42 children. Shreya would like to thank Elizabeth Bathory, Homer Simpson and Bouguereau for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
I think the easiest part would be doodling the initial concept and looking for references. The hardest is composition, storytelling and trying to get the final image to do justice to the original idea (and not losing interest/getting lazy along the way).

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Mostly from movies, stuff by Tim Burton, del Toro and Miyazaki stir up my imagination quite a bit. Also I lurk a lot online, in galleries and forums and that can be pretty inspirational.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
I think one of the most important things is the whole variety of styles that you get exposed to with communities that have worldwide memberships. It makes you more open minded about art and subject matter and that always helps in your artistic growth. Also sometimes when you are the best in your own little circle, its easy to get complacent but when you look around and see these fantastic artists who are probably half your age in different parts of the world who are so dedicated and doing so well, it's sort of a good kick in the behind to not be lazy and work harder.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I usually get the " she looks like you!!" comment for the portraits I do. I once drew a monster and one of the first comments I got from a friend was that it looked like me. It was just so funny because it was such a standard comment by then, I was sort of expecting it.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Practice, practice, practice!





Please make sure to check out her blog and her deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Monday, March 8, 2010

Jeannie Paske

Jeannie Paske is known for her work with rutabagas. Jeannie first started drawing when she was only 9 years old, making her a child prodigy. However, the peculiar pressure of being a child prodigy obviously got to her and she had a pensive breakdown, resulting in her cutting off her own hand! Jeannie found lonely inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in her study for all the clouds to see! Jeannie eventually got married to Peter Pan and they remain together quietly in the Space Station with their 3 children. Jeannie would like to thank Martin Luther King Jr., Kermit the Frog and Hironimos Bosch for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
The easiest would be coming up with concepts and the most difficult would be deciding when a piece is actually finished.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Everywhere! I usually have sketch books lying around so that when an idea strikes I can jot it down. I am particularly inspired my the sky and am influenced by too much cartoon watching and over-analyzation of my surroundings.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
The exposure these communities can bring to an artist.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
My mom once described one of my creations as a hairy Mister Potato Head. I thought that was pretty funny.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Do what you love to do and be honest and kind to others.





Please make sure to check out her blog! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Friday, March 5, 2010

Jenyffer Maria

Jenyffer Maria is known for her work with kitty printed band-aids. Jen first started drawing when she was only 28 years old, making her a child prodigy. However, the buttonish pressure of being a child prodigy accidentally got to her and she had a cherried breakdown, resulting in her cutting off her own funny bone! Jen found polypainted inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in her love room for all the lollipops to see! Jen eventually got married to Minky and they remain together inquisitively in their Twinkle Factory with their 8 children. Jen would like to thank Albert Einstein, Britney Spears and Lady Gaga for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
As long as I have all my materials I need to make I'm content. It's when that ink pen starts running low on its juice. I will use up to it's last drop because I rather be at home while I'm in my zone than at the store buying more pens. It has happened before though and it's rough, ha. I'm also really disorganized and careless with what I do, for example the drawings that are currently scattered (some even ruined) all over my floor and that I try to step over in the middle of the night when I need to use the bathroom. I'm working that that!

Where and how do you find inspiration?
Absolutely everywhere. Mostly though from people and music. I'm mostly inspired by people with intricate or exaggerated features. Features not necessarily found appealing to society, I find to be perfection. It's boring to doodle the "beautiful" or the "average", show me your big noses and sunken eyes, your disproportionate breasts and huge thighs! And music, I love all of it. I'm not just saying that, I truly do appreciate all music. There are so many lyrics, melodies out there to fit any mood I many be in and that all goes with my process. I've currently had Marina & the Diamonds on repeat, I highly recommend it. My muse at the moment is the GAGA of all ladies! Lady Gaga has to be the force that is most in touch with what I want to do and am doing right now. But yeah inspiration to me really comes from all over the place whether it be from the mexican telenovela I've invested myself emotionally with or a simple trip to the grocery store. Being alive, basically -- breathing.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
The internet is truly the tool to use these days if you want to share with the world your art. It has been for me, anyway. I've been blessed with one of the most inspiring and beautiful art communities I have ever been a part of for the past two years now, HitRECord.org. A place that appreciates the act of hitting that red RECording button and collaborating with one another (anybody!) on an international basis. That's what art is, a huge cluster fuck of collaborative inspiration. We recently screened at the Sundance Film Festival and one of the pieces we presented was "Morgan M. Morgansen's Date With Destiny", never in my wildest thoughts/dreams did I think I'd ever have illustrations in a a short film being screened in front of an audience. HitRECord's given me a sense of direction and such incredible amounts of motivation and confidence. Something that was hard to come by as I scrubbed toilets and made beds for a living once. I'm making art, doing what I love on a global level with people from all over the world, if that isn't awesome I don't know what is.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
I usually take those comments as compliments so nothing really sticks out. It's exciting to hear interpretations of certain pieces that I've done with an actual idea in mind but that no one will ever get from looking at it but me. Listening to the stories that evolve from others just by looking at a piece, whether it be negative or positive, is the best. I'm crude and foul myself as a person so for something to weird me out, it's tough.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Have fun. That's really it, just have fun doing what you do. If it's no longer fun, take a break. Be selfish, not in a greedy or rude manner but in the terms of setting time for yourself. Explore the world, get lost in a new city, talk to strangers, go to the movies by yourself. Also, do not be afraid to "do what's been done already" because c'mon, who the fuck cares and what hasn't? Remix the hell out of the old and the new, with others in mind make it your own! Real art has no boundaries, it's the ultimate form of expression. As long as you make it your own and you're having fun! Have a blast! ♥





Please make sure to check out her web site and her work on hitRECord! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Ben Templesmith

Ben Templesmith is known for his work with cats. Ben first started drawing when he was only 10 years old, making him a child prodigy. However, the fast pressure of being a child prodigy knackered got to him and he had a slow breakdown, resulting in him cutting off his own anal gland! Ben found convulsing inspiration from the lost limb and decided to frame it and hang it in his living room for all the cannibals to see! Ben eventually got married to Mohammed and they remain together rapidly in their public restroom with their 2 children. Ben would like to thank George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Tim Burton for their constant support and inspiration.

What are the easiest and the hardest parts of the artistic process?
Coming up with ideas. Following through with them.

Where and how do you find inspiration?
History, real life, movies & odd conversation.

What do you feel is the significance of online communities, such as deviantART, to aspiring artists?
No idea, I'm not an aspiring artist. No one is, except those who can't draw. To aspire to be an artist means you're not already one. I think you're either an artist or you're not! You can however, aspire to be a *better* one.

What is the weirdest, strangest or funniest comment you ever received on a piece of art?
That I am a hack, derivative of no less than 5 other artists who yes, may be influences. I think if I can somehow meld aspects of all their work into one...I must be doing something right? This guy was hilarious.

What advice can you offer to other artists?
Don't give up. Be your own worst critic. 99% of the greats had knock backs and carried on, but 100% of failures gave up their dreams or never bothered to try because they thought it too hard.





Please make sure to check out his web site and his deviantART page! And as always, please respect the art and the artist. Art Libs has gained permission from the artists to feature their work on our site. If you would like to use any of the art for ANY reason, you MUST obtain your own permission. Please do not steal or reproduce any art. Respect the art!